"Going to the roots of the Frank Family"
June 26, 2019

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Luella Frank Jensen
A Sketch or History of My Life - Started in January 1960

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I learned a variety of ways to cook and do house work. In the fall of 1908, I went to work at the American Steam Laundry on East Center in Logan. I got $6.00 per week which was the biggest wages I had made thus far. I had to walk to Logan to work and home again. Included in the group who worked with me were Irene and Desta Campbell, Malinda Bauman, Edith Jensen, Malinda and Estella Jones and my sister Hazel. Some of the girls quit before I did. Sometimes in warm weather, I helped milk cows both morning and night. I had the privilege to take only 13 organ lessons while I worked at the Laundry - had to get up early and practice before leaving home at 7 a.m. to walk to work, then take my lesson during my noon hour. My teacher was Mr. Smurthwaite, the first man who played the pipe organ in the Logan Tabernacle. After working at the laundry about a year, I quit. I worked at the home of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Ault and helped them move to Logan. I also helped at the George Marler home when Mrs. Marler broke her hip. I then went to work at the home of Dr. and Mrs. T. B. Budge in November 1909. The later part of January 1910, I quit there to be home with mother as she was expecting a baby. I asked her when it was to arrive but got no answer. I had been keeping steady company with Gottfreid Valdemar (Fred) Jensen for 1½ years, and we were planning to be married. Not knowing when mother's baby was due, we planned to be married 27 April 1910. The baby came 15 April. We were encouraged by neighbors and friends to go ahead when we had the date set which we did and were married 27 April 1910 in the Logan Temple by President William Budge. We would have waited until June, but not knowing the details, we were married. I came home to help with the work. I taught the Primary class in Sunday School for a year before I was married.

After our marriage, we lived in Millville for 5 months. I worked in Religion Class and sang in the choir. We moved to Providence in October 1910. Our first child and eldest son was born, Frank Valdemar, 30 May 1911. I joined the Relief Society before he was born and have worked in that organization since that time having served as work director, chairman of committee on burial clothes for 4 years, social science leader 2 years, have been chorister for 18 years and am still holding that office. I am also a visiting teacher, which I have done for more than 30 years. Harry was born 16 January 1913. That year we had a lot of snow. I was asked to work on the Old Folks Committee, which I did for 18 years and really enjoyed that work. We held a party twice each year and went to a lot of work and expense for these affairs. Most of the married people in town would attend, but all over 60 years were honored guests, as were widows and widowers. This was our winter parties. Then the summer parties were with the Stake and only the guests were invited. Our ward was divided in 1909 but the two wards still met together for the winter parties. We held these parties in the Pavilion where we had the basement to serve the dinners from long tables then the stage for the programs. The two Ward Committees would meet together and choose some of the members to act on various committees, programs, games, music, and the dinner, then the women would meet after visiting or calling each woman in town to see if they wanted to help with dinner. Then we would put them in groups with a chairman. They would meet and decide on their menus. Some chose to serve dinner and some supper. So we had 2 big meals, then between meals relays and games, and some old time dances. More program after supper and a dance - a big day and all worn out.

Ethyl was born December 11, 1914 and Dorothy March 4, 1917. The night before Dorothy was born it snowed so much, the snow was up to the top of the fences. The Doctor had to come with a horse and cutter. That day Father was in Salt Lake to meet the train bringing the soldiers from the Mexican border. My brother Austin was with them. The boys were home on leave and then they were stationed at Fort Douglas, Salt Lake City.

In the fall of 1918, an epidemic of flu was raging and Fred had pneumonia. We all caught it from him. His mother came to help us, but she got sick and had to leave. My sister, Genevieve came and wore a mask. She mixed the mustard plasters then brought it to me. We were all down with flu. Fred on one end of the bed and me on the opposite end with a child by our feet and one in the baby buggy and one on chairs where I could reach and test their temperature. I would kneel in bed and put the plasters on Fred and then take them off and rub with oil. He was really bad, the Doctor said after that he didn't expect he would get out alive. Bishop Godfrey Fuhriman wore a mask and came in and administered to him. He was healed. The disease went like the wind as Brother Fuhriman prayed for. Therma was born 11 January 1919. She was a small baby but a full time baby. All were well again and very grateful to be alive to raise my family as many pregnant women died from flu.

Marjorie was born 7 August 1921. Clark G. was born 10 March 1924 - everyone happy for another boy. In 1942, he was drafted into the army of World War II. After about 1½ years, he was released having had a nervous breakdown and was in the Bushnell Hospital at Brigham City. LuDene was born 22 March 1927. Another small baby, but she grew and did well. I had my tonsils out during this pregnancy. Hal Ramon was born 28 February 1930. He weighed 9½ pounds. Dorothy and Therma had small pox in September before Hal was born, and we all had to be vaccinated. I was sure sick, but the baby did well. In March 1932, I had a terrible hemorrhage, almost lost my life. This proved to be a false conception. I was 4½ months pregnant. No baby, but normal afterbirth. The following year 11 February 1933, Stephen Louis was born. He weighed 11 pounds and gained 1 ounce each day for several weeks. This baby seemed to bring me good health again. I have been normally well since.

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